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Barton-on-Sea  May & August 2000

 

Barton-on-Sea May & August 2000

Barton-on-Sea October 2001

Barton-on-Sea 25 October 2010

 

Barton on multimap

 

 

800Barton-east-erosion.jpg (154877 bytes)

 

The classic view of the buildings on the edge.  Little has changed since the work to grade the cliff in the 1970s after major landslides, but the creeping slips are creating a steep unstable slope angle, and have ruined the walkway which went along the middle level of the cliff as part of the profile engineering.  At the sea edge, what is left of the older wooden groynes, as well as the new stone breakwaters are evident, as is the sheer tonnage of rock imported to balance the toe of the slip and prevent wave erosion.

 

800Barton-east-erosion.jpg (154877 bytes)

 

 

 

800Barton-west-cliff.jpg (292095 bytes)

Barton-on-Sea looking west, August 2000.  Hengistbury Head is to the far left.  This is a less managed section of the coast, although debris in the slips suggests old works were here.  Creep is slower, judging by the greater amount of vegetation.  In the background is a very active area of slips, without defences, and a caravan sites is being lost.  It is hoped this area will reach equilibrium and erosion slow down once the cliff profile is flatter.

 

Barton/800Barton-west-cliff.jpg (292k)

 

 

800Barton-west-groynes.jpg (97386 bytes)

Across the local authority border, breakwater and cliff toe stabilisation work, similar to Barton, has been carried out.  Note how the previous scheme was causing terminal groyne syndrome, and the new work has had to be extended into the bay which resulted (centre right).

800Barton-west-groynes.jpg (97386 bytes)

 

 

800Barton-west-rotate.jpg (157279 bytes)

To the west of the small cluster of shops on the cliff top in Barton is a long greensward. This shot, to the west, shows a rotational slump developing from the cliff-top. The top layers of the cliff are sands, and can be clearly seen here. Houses, lining the north side of the sea road, can be seen on the right-hand skyline.

 

800Barton-west-rotate.jpg (157279 bytes)

 

 

800Barton-west-slump.jpg (137534 bytes)

This part of the cliff, beneath the most westernmost part of the greensward, is a et and wild place of slumps and slips, dense mats of rampant grasses .. and a mudslide, seen in the centre of the photograph as a smooth grey area. The lower part of the cliffs, being clays, are very mobile, and especially so in wet weather.

 

800Barton-west-slump.jpg (137534 bytes)

 

 

800Barton-west-step.jpg (112294 bytes)

The cliff retreat has been the subject of a great deal of expensive engineering. Here can be seen a service track running along the slopes (there is also vehicular access along some of the area immediately behind the water), pebble-filled drainage channels running down the slope, and one of the rock-groynes designed to reduce the rate of longshore drift.

800Barton-west-step.jpg (112294 bytes)

 

 

800Barton-west-piling.jpg (161887 bytes)

The stabilisation of the slope has not been without its setbacks. Here a stretch of track has disappeared, and is working its way back as a series of cracks, and the sheet-steel piling in the centre is letting go!

 

800Barton-west-piling.jpg (161887 bytes)

 

 

 

800Bartoncliff-drain.jpg (173089 bytes)

The massive nature of the defence works and general earth-moving can be seen here. In the centre is a drainage chamber, part of the system that keeps the cliffs and cliff-top area as dry as possible to reduce mass movement. 

800Bartoncliff-drain.jpg (173089 bytes)

 

 

800Bartoncliff-drain2.jpg (153001 bytes)

Many stone drains run down the graded slope, a good deal of which has been successfully vegetated. Near the water is a shingle beach, backed up by boulder rip-rap and a rock road.

 

800Bartoncliff-drain2.jpg (153001 bytes)

 

 

800Barton-rockgroyne.jpg (137514 bytes)

 

A rock groyne, roadway, and more disintegrating sheet-piling further up the slope.

800Barton-rockgroyne.jpg (137514 bytes)

 

 

 

 

 

August 2000

 

 

800Barton-cows.jpg (124520 bytes)

Looking back towards Barton from Long Mead End or the Tunniford Gap. 

This point can be approached from Milford along the cliff-top, or from a car park off the B3058 road, situated at SZ265925. From the car park the coast is only a few hundred yards distance.

800Barton-cows.jpg (124520 bytes)

 

 

 

800Barton007_31.JPG (146320 bytes)

 

This view is found in Dr Ian West web pages on the geology of Barton; indeed there is an annotated photo of the scene.

 

800Barton007_31.JPG (146320 bytes)

 

 

 

800Barton010_28.JPG (111660 bytes)

To the east of the Tunniford Gap are high cliffs, with well-vegetated lower flanks. Here erosion has clearly found a temporary equilibrium behind a fair width of beach.

 

800Barton010_28.JPG (111660 bytes)

 

 

800Barton005_33.JPG (159354 bytes)

Erosion is significant further west, towards the golf course. Slumping  has carried material towards the beach, some of it in  a very mobile form, with water pockets seen on the surface.

 

800Barton005_33.JPG (159354 bytes)

 

 

 

800Barton004_34.JPG (131360 bytes)

A zoom-in on the detail of the above photograph. Dr West has a labelled photo in this general vicinity as well.

 

800Barton004_34.JPG (131360 bytes)

links

http://www.streetmap.co.uk/streetmap.dll?G2M?X=423920&Y=92997&A=Y&Z=3

 

http://www.geodata.soton.ac.uk/hypermail/envsci99/group5/topic3/0007.html

Dr Ian West's Geology Pages

http://www.soton.ac.uk/~imw/barton.htm

 

Hampshire Barton-on-Sea coasts erosion defences mass movement rock groynes

 

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