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Felixstowe Ferry  18 March 2009

 

Felixstowe Ferry 10 Feb 2002

Felixstowe Ferry July 2006

Felixstowe Ferry  February 2007

Felixstowe Front and Ferry November 2007 and 25 March 2008

Felixstowe Ferry 4 July 2008

Felixstowe Ferry 18 March 2009

 

Felixstowe Front 19/20 September 2008

Felixstowe Front 10 Feb 2002

Felixstowe- Landguard Point

 

 

From the car park on Cliff Road (Clifflands) you get a vista over the golf course to the north-east ...

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The golf course is flanked by the sea to the east, and protected throughout its length by fixed defences, namely a sea wall with stepped concrete toe defences. On the left, however, the sea wall, and rip-rap groynes, have been rendered temporarily obsolete by the massive build up of a shingle beach.

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Golfers enjoying the spring sunshine share space with greenkeepers adding fertilizer to the course.

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The view down over the beach huts towards the sea shows much change, and at this very low water, dramatic change at that, The lengthening shingle bar had already cut off the rock groynes from the sea, but has now extended to the south-west to end almost opposite the beach huts.

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Beach huts and groynes, and a very steep beach characterise this stretch of foreshore, just opposite the end of the growing bar cusp.

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The beach inshore of the growing spit.

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The exceptionally low tide has drained some of the lagoons that abut the sea wall and that have surrounded the rock groynes

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It is ironic that only in the area of the rock groynes has the shingle failed to colonise the foreshore right up to the sea wall!

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The shingle ridge developed further offshore here, and so high tides full of shingle were unable to penetrate over their own deposits to fill up this basin. The height of the shingle bank is high to the seaward of the lagoons.

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The beach towards the south, left, and north, right, was about 3 metres from top to bottom at its greatest.

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Ripples offshore indicate the shallows are extensive, the shingle extending much further offshore.

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The slack water behind the shingle beach will normally be much more extensive and there was no vegetation colonising the tidal zone.

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It is quite exciting to be standing fifty metres offshore, on shingle clearly a few centimetres above sea level, whilst the processes of longshore drift visibly add to the spit.

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There were two bars that had dry access from the shore, the above being the northern shingle bank.

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Views from the northern bank to the south, left, along a rather deep-looking channel, centre and to the north .. to Felixstowe Ferry, right.

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Bawdsey Manor and a profile of the coast around to Bawdsey Cliffs.

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The shore has come under repeated assault just to the south of Felixstowe Ferry, and, for some seasons, rip-rap has been added to protect the sea wall.

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Some of the smaller stones from the rip-rap have been swept to the south   ...

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... and I do wonder if this decidedly unattractive section of coast, within an area of such beauty, might be better served by moving some of the excess shingle back up he coast a couple of hundred yards!

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A boat leaves Felixstowe Ferry down the channel of Woodbridge Haven which is, I presume, a hazardous navigation.

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The footway is blocked to allow the diggers, three of them, and a truck to operate along the top of the sea wall. You can see the rip-rap overtopping the line of the line of the wall.

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Plastic fencing casts a chevron line down the embankment, left, and the dumper truck scuttles to-and-from removing materials, right. The monolithic wall of rip-rap, two metres high, casts a sombre shadow over the beach.

 

 

 

 

The digger loading the dumper with waste from the beach .. and the contractor's yard where another two diggers are stored. All three machines are on the large side for diggers!

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Natural defences again in front of the Martello Tower.

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Views of the shingle accretions on both shores of the Deben. The centre shot shows the steep landward flank of the shingle.

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Bawdsey Manor across the River Deben, with the shingle banks of  'The Knolls' being shown to advantage, as they are on the right.

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The Martello tower at the ferry basks in the morning sunshine, its brick wall of limed and lichen-pocked  brick a study in textures.

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The mouth of the Deben and the Bawdsey shore, with its system of timber and rock groyne, centre.

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The series of rock groynes on the south side of the River Deben, are matched by timber groynes on the northern shore

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Felixstowe Ferry boasts a couple of pubs, left and right and, centre, the road from the town, with the ridge of higher land of Rue's Farm showing along the skyline across Felixstowe Marshes.

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Approaching the ferry along the river, and right, along the road ... with its fish prices displayed!

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Boats being maintained at the boatyards, and for me a first sight of the sand bar called @The Horse Sands' midstream the River Deben.

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By the banks of the Deben; boats overwintering and the ferry jetty, as yet almost deserted at a low tide and, right, the concrete matting  and shingle characterising the last few metres before the ferry.

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A last look back over the golf course and the coast towards Felixstowe Ferry, on a fine day in an anticyclonic week in March.

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Felixstowe Ferry River Deben  Bawdsey Manor coasts defences hard erosion change beaches groynes sand defences management groynes sailing golf leisure shingle bars

 

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