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Étretat , Upper Normandy, France   23 August 2008

Treport, Upper Normandy, 22 August 2008

 

A Google Earth search established the famous cliffs are to the south of the town so a route was taken from the new car parking on the Le Havre road, that lands one on the coast just on the southern boundary of the golf course -perfect! The lighthouse is a mile or so to the south and, at low, tide, a fine wave-cut platform is the first feature of the day! Beyond is the breakwater of the tanker terminal at Havre-Antifer.

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A promontory promises a view to north and south.

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You can climb out on the promontory, seen above, to get a view southwards, and of the beach, with its cliff fall.

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The Manneporte, the second arch to the south, as seen from the promontory to its south.

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The Manneporte's scale is illustrated by the people on top f the feature, and, in the bay, a waterfall results from seepage down to an  impervious layer. The beach is pebble and cobble sized.

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More views to the south, including a wave-cut notch, right.

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The cliff edge is often fluted by deep gullies, and a thin topsoil masks the upper slopes of the massive chalk.

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The Manneporte reveals well-defined strata in the chalk, a cobble beach .. and a glimpse of the Porte d'Amante through its arch.

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Looking back to the south an arch in the shape of a keyhole is revealed ... and the close up shows steel ladders for people to clamber along the beach and get by these rock obstacles. On the right is a series of wave-cut notches.

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The Manneporte also boasts ironwork, with what looks like an attendant standing by!

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Looking back to the south and a trio of para-gliders approach over the lighthouse!

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The 'Jewel in the Crown' at Étretat is undoubtedly the Porte d'Amante, with its filigree arch and the brilliant white stack of the Needle of Arsene Lupin.

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Porte d'Amante in any scale to your requirements! The cliff top gullying in the chalk is very noticeable here.

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The people who come to Étretat  are at least partially there to see the coastal features, so they make their way up the cliffs is some numbers. They also clamber along at beach level, over the steel ladders and indicate a culture distinctly less 'elf 'n safety' than that which prevails in Britain! Erosion of bare soils can be severe, but on the Porte d'Amante the whole surface has been covered in rough concrete!

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South and northwards shots indicate wave-cut platforms and intermittent beaches.

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Porte d'Amante.

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The Manneporte.

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The Manneporte, left, and the approach to the concrete-covered Porte d'Amante.

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People on the Porte d'Amante.

 

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People mill around on the Porte d'Amante, whilst the Needle of Arsene Lupin clearly awaits its moment of stardom!

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The town of Étretat and the Porte d'Amont beyond.

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Amant Door.

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Chambre des Demoiselles.

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The wave-cut platform is striking from the Porte d'Amante, and seems to have been the base of some industrial or military construction, left.

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Views of Étretat from the Chambre des Demoiselles.

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Étretat beach and town. The concrete groyne emphasises the tide lines on the steep beach.

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Étretat beach is of cobbles and is steep and broken by tide lines. On the hill to the north is a monument to the last flight of Charles Nungesser and François Coli  in 1927, trying to fly the Atlantic east-west, but whom were never seen again. There is a museum nearby.

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More of the beach, the church on the headland and the town.

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Porte d'Aval, and the Porte d'Amont (right).

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Beach, cliffs and church.

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Behind the cobble beach was an angles sea wall that allowed dinghies to be winched up and secured.

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Tourism is multi-layered here, and includes passive as well as active tourism!

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A beach restaurant has an unusual base in a thatched boat hull!

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France Étretat Manneporte Porte d'Amante Porte d'Aval Porte d'Amont coast features cliffs arches stacks wave cut platform beach chalk tourism management

 

 

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