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Lyme Regis  - new defences  22 September

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapman's Pool

Chesil Beach - 1998 storms  August 2000  April 2006  April 2007

Corfe Castle

 

Durdle Door - April 2006  April 2007

Durleston

 

Furzy Cliffs

 

Kimmeridge Bay

 

Lulworth Cove  Colchester VIth Form College AS Fieldwork Oct 2001

Lulworth Cove  4 April 2007 am.

Lulworth Cove  4 April 2007 pm.

 

Lyme Regis coast defences  Sep 2007

 

Old Harry Rocks

Old Harry Rocks April 2006

 

Osmington Mills

 

Studland

Swanage beach and cliffs

 

West Bay harbour engineering works Feb 2004

West Bay harbour defence works, October 2004

West Bay, harbour and cliffs, August 2005

 

White Nothe April 2006

 

 

 

Dr Ian West's geology guide

http://www.soton.ac.uk/~imw/Lyme-Regis-town.htm

 

 

The coastline eastwards from Lyme Regis; with the lias cliffs of Back Ven on the left, Charmouth in the dip to the right, then Stonebarrow Hill (topped by sands) and then Golden Cap  and finally Thorncombe Beacon, West Bay and Burton Bradstock cliffs.

 

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The area on the eastern side of Lyme Regis, Gun cliff, has been remodelled to provide good sea defences, from stone walls and extensive rip-rap, and a tourist area of great charm - a model of what can be achieved in my view!

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The rip rap and stone walls of the Church Cliff area .. and a small beach alongside a wonderfully-patched groyne! Stonebarrow is in the background of the two shots on the left, golden Cap and Thorncombe on the right.

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With the eastern part of the wave-cut platform, broad ledge in the foreground, the clay lias cliffs of 'The Spittles' appear, left and centre, with Stonebarrow Hill and its lias cliffs on the right.

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More of the lias clay of 'The Spittles', 'Broad Ledge' wave-cut-platform and Black Ven.

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A the eastern end of the promenade the coastline is managed by a sea wall and groynes, before giving way to unmanaged, and mobile, cliffs  ... so the sign is more than decoration!

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The photographs above illustrate the quality of the Church Cliffs defence area; the addition of artefacts, such as canon and flower-filled beacon baskets, together with quality fittings and well-constructed stonework make the whole area most attractive.

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With the reseeding of the beach in Lyme, to a height of within a foot of the promenade, another user-friendly tourist area has been created. Along this front are vendors of fast food and drinks, and occasional shows on the beach, such as the stone-balancer on the right hand shot.

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The beach has been divided by a large stone groyne, of superior finish. Only on Ian West's site (yellow link) did I discover the groyne had been assembled from pre-cast blocks with the textured finish imprinted on the requisite faces! On the right is an intermediate rock groyne, supporting one end of a stone breakwater that, at high tide, must be completely cut off from the shore!

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From the stone breakwater and over the rock groyne towards the town and unstable sloped behind.

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The view behind the stone groyne now shifts round to the lias cliffs.

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A boat of sea anglers, rods racked along the side, comes home.

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The harbour has  an extensive slipway for the laughing of small boats.

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The harbour and the Cobb, still the primary defence of the town and massively thick, it is a visitor attraction in its own right, to walk its sloping glacis and, of course, think of the story of the 'French Lieutenant's Woman'.

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The Cobb has clearly been patched  and reinforced many times over the years, and has also been subject to chemical erosion of its limestone blocks.

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At the end of the Cobb the breakwater recurves, and has now been extended by a rip-rap groyne .. with 'keep off' signs!

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The harbour entrance is yet another magnet for tourists, with some boats either fishing themselves or taking sea-fishing parties out for hire.

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The landward fork of the Lyme Regis harbour breakwater (the shape of the outer breakwater is like a musical tuning fork). Beyond the fishermen is the harbour entrance

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