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Walton-on-the-Naze

 

 

 

 

9 April 2011

 

 

 

Walton-on-the-Naze index

 

The damage to the Mabel Greville breakwater, left, reported last trip shows up well, but, surprisingly, the next concrete groyne to the north, right,  has suffered a similar fate. In the absence of storms, frost damage is still a favourite cause. In the centre is the drying mud  road from the construction access to the Naze.

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A falling beach to the south of the new Crag Walk, indicated by blocks rotating forward (and getting heavily encrusted with growths  at the same time), left. On the right the massive fall from one side of the groyne from the other, indicating a south to the north movement of beach material.

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The finished Crag Walk, with a gravelled surface and large rocks either side to sit on; the old beach access is still operational on the right-hand shot.

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Between the granite spit and the mobile flows of the crag cliffs, a trench exists. I see this filing up with the push from above; hopefully it will not overtop the walkway!

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A couple of months since my last visit shows further significant mass movement in the eroding amphitheatre, such as the concrete slab, centre, and the progress of mobile flows.

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A fine touch is the provision of generous quantities of information to inform the viewer as to what they are observing. Clearly, field groups can be set tasks from such sources!

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Lots more lovely information ... at high resolution!

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The northern extent of the granite spit is marked by heavy wooden steps and hand rails. This should guarantee access to the beach at practically all states of the tide, but it must be noted that the beach has been lowered to the clay basement and little sand remains.

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The end of the pier!  A good cross section of the crag can be obtained looking back towards the Tower.

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The Tower, granite blocks and mobile flows - which will survive longest?

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To the north of the new coastal works, its business as usual, with mobile flows spilling out over the beach. Here, the exceptionally dry Spring has dried them out and they are crumbling, not flowing, to eventual destruction.

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A warning sign is about to be undermined.

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Drying clay blocks crumble and fall down the slope, left, or slide off smooth shear planes of clay, centre and right.

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Some slumped material had consolidated and allowed grass growth, before again sliding down in the dry spell.

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More crumbly clay from, left and centre, slumping and mobile flows and, right, a simple cliff fall.

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On the right is the exposure of plastic sheeting associated with the concrete-faced embankment that is currently being torn up from seawards.

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Coming back along the cliff, walking south towards the Tower, the display of slumping continues to impress.

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More rotational slumps, before the broken mass moves off seaward as a mobile flow.

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The new Crag Walk is designed to be a protection for the Naze Tower, as well as afford visitors and enhanced view of the erosion.

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The volume of material will, I feel, challenge the capabilities of the stone walkway to hold it in place.

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The current state of play in the first embayment.

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Walton-on-the-Naze  Crag Walk tourism viewing  interpretation panels A-frame Breakwater Tower coasts cliffs erosion beaches groynes clay sand defences mobile slides rotational slumps  wave cut platform

 

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