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Walton-on-the-Naze

 

1 March 2008

 

Walton-on-the-Naze  1998

 

Walton-on-the-Naze  July 30 2001

Walton-on-the-Naze  September 22 2001

 

Walton-on-the-Naze  January 1 2002

Walton-on-the-Naze  February 15 2002

Walton-on-the-Naze  May 26 2002

Walton-on-the-Naze  November 16 2002

 

Walton-on-the-Naze  January 6 2003

Walton-on-the-Naze  October 30 2003

 

Walton-on-the-Naze  January 18 2004

Walton-on-the-Naze  June 5 2004 Naze Tower

Walton-on-the-Naze  June 5 2004

Walton-on-the-Naze  November 3 2004

 

Walton-on-the-Naze  February 2005

Walton-on-the-Naze  May 29 2005

Walton-on-the-Naze  July 2005

Walton-on-the-Naze  November  2005

 

Walton-on-the-Naze  February 2006

Walton-on-the-Naze  September 2006

 

Walton-on-the-Naze  February 2007

Walton-on-the-Naze  May 2007

Walton-on-the-Naze Aug 1 2007

 

Walton-on-the-Naze January  12 2008

Walton-on-the-Naze March 1 2008

 

'Save the Naze for Future Days '

links to local groups fighting to save the coastline at Walton

 

Naze Notes - a revamped site with good support for fieldwork - includes November 2007 surge!

The Naze Protection Society - seagull logo above! - very good on erosion history.

NAZE NEWS Digest of stories - past and present - including new revetment plan!

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The Naze Tower   

 

The Naze, Old Hall Lane, Walton-on-the-Naze, Essex, CO14 8LE

 

Opening times are: April-November 10am-5pm

 

Admission prices:

2.50  per person

1.50  per child 4-15 years.  Under 4 years  free

6 per family - 2 adults & up to 4 children under 15 years

12 Friend of the Naze Tower - all year + two guest slots

22 pair adults, 33 for a family

School groups (such as fieldwork)  .. reduced rate - book in advance.

contact: e-mail  mail@nazetower.co.uk or phone 01255 852519

 

 

 

March 1 2008

 

 

 

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The beach immediately north of the Mabel Greville breakwater.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recent longshore drift has been from the south, as has been the wind  - although on the left a shingle beach indicates movement from the north.

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The managed shoreline at Walton, with drained and graded slopes behind a sea wall defended by sheet piling and concrete blocks.

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Access to the beach has become improbable at the A-frame groyne, due to beach lowering. Now all sand has gone, despite it still being generated from the crag above, to reveal the clay basement. On the right, although unknown to me at the time, a couple of Felixstowe cranes had been written off by a drifting freighter.

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Photos from the bottom of the cliff to the top, as access to the beach, even close to low tide, was not possible. The right-hand photos has detail shots below.

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Mass movement, in a number of guises, is always active in the embayment,  with ground fractures, left, and slope failure, centre, always visible.

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Attempts to fence the cliff-top have been abandoned as the large concrete areas are undermined. The cliff's free-face is increasing in height as the slumps are consumed by the sea and they rotate forwards.

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Mobile flows of saturated material slide onto the clay beach. In the centre a stagnant pool of water is held mid-slope.

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Erosion is greatest to the north of the Tower embayment, with mobile flows derived from the water table, centre, and continued cliff-top slumping, right.

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Some more detail of this erosion hothouse - and very reminiscent of the backwall and bowl of a glacial system.

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There have been changes in the north, at the Naze, where the old defensive wall continues to retreat, being attacked from its flank. The lagoon is back and has been reshaped - doubtless by the surge especially.

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The lagoon is backed by the sea wall and is, at high tide, often inundated by the sea, which reshapes the sand deposits brought over the beach.

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The lagoon was draining across the beach, driven by very strong winds from the west - blowing sand can be seen on the right.

 

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Only a few low cliffs of clay remain on the beach, left, with battered Felixstowe behind. On the right are the remnants of the sea wall, littering the beach with concrete.

 

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The low cliffs in the north get progressively higher towards the south, and all show the effects of recent erosion, such as falls of the overlying Red Crag, centre, and the impressive bowl of mobile material on the right. This is the 'corrie' referred to earlier; fro the beach the glacial analogy is equally relevant!

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More of the 'glacial' flow on the left, with  a 'marker' photo of the two concrete round gun bases, centre will serve as a reference in future years.

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Clays harden and crumble, left, even as they approach the remnants of the beach and are eroded, whilst overlying sandy crag slides over the clays, centre and mobile flows  reach the beach on the right.

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The rubble-strewn beach below the Naze Tower, and the actively slumping material coming onto it. As the slumping progresses the free face increases in height, centre, and this will lead to large slumps including the top of the cliff - which will be dramatic and soon threaten the cafe.

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A curious 'pinnacle' of clay is extruded from the mobile flow. This temporary shard looks to have only a brief moment or two of fame! Old concrete aprons are being broken up on a beach stripped of sand and noticeably lowered.

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To exit the beach you have to climb over the rip rap, as the concrete steps, with rails, will drop you into a metre of water. The new route does, however, provide a good view of the beach, and it is sobering to note, when looking at the centre photo, that this is about an hour after low water!

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After clambering over the rip rap, this new path takes you back to the promenade.

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Walton-on-the-Naze Essex coast coastal erosion rotational slumping cliffs defences groynes longshore drift breakwaters  lagoons beaches Felixstowe cranes

 

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